Fitbit Flex vs Nike Fuelband


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Fitbit Flex
This slim, stylish device is with you all the time. During the day, it tracks steps, distance, and calories burned. At night, it tracks your sleep cycle and wakes you silently in the morning. Just check out the lights to see how you stack up against your personal goal. It’s the motivation you need to get out and be more active.
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Nike Fuelband
The Nike+ FuelBand is designed for anyone who wants to be more active. It measures your daily activity and turns it all into NikeFuel. So you can set a goal for every day and then go out and beat it. Life is a sport. Make it Count.

Latest news about Fitbit Flex and Nike Fuelband:



04.01.17. Fitbit integrates with virtual reality bikes. Fitbit is rolling out new integrations to its top-selling fitness trackers. Peleton, a stationary bike company that offers live streaming classes, will feature Fitbit integration, letting users track their progress on the bike with their wearable, including a full post-workout break down. Ditto for VirZOOM, the indoor VR bike that we tried out at E3 last year, so users can track all of the time they’ve spent peddling around as a Pegasus or tank. Data collected includes distance pedaled (or, one assumes, miles flown in the case of the flying horse), workout time and calories burned. The partnerships will be on display this week at CES.



29.08.16. Fitbit unveiled waterproof Flex 2 and smarter Charge 2. Fitbit is updating two of its most popular fitness trackers - the new waterproof Flex 2 and heart rate-tracking Charge 2. With the $150 Charge 2, Fitbit redesigned its Charge HR with a larger display that makes the tracker look and feel more like a fitness watch. The Charge's fitness-tracking abilities have also been upgraded with new features that are able to record specific types of workouts, like weightlifting, runs, bike rides and interval sessions, and the tracker will automatically recognize some types of activities like yoga and running. If the Charge 2 is more fitness tracker than you need, Fitbit is also releasing a new version of its smallest tracker, the $99.95 Flex 2. It became much slimmer and  water-resistant (at depths up to 164-feet). Like the Flex before it, the Flex 2 eschews a traditional display in favor of a series of LED lights that indicate your progress throughout the day.



29.07.14. Fitbit becomes the first activity tracker that syncs to Windows Phone. Fitbit has decided to add Windows Phone to its list of supported platforms.  A Windows Phone 8.1 version of the app is set to debut in Microsoft’s app store on Monday (here’s the link though the app wasn’t live at publication time), offering direct Bluetooth synchronization and the full set of features offered on the Android and iOS versions. Fitbit for Windows Phone pairs with a wearable activity tracker like the Fitbit Flex, keeping track of the wearer's activity. When you launch the app, you'll be able to see how many steps you've walked, the number of calories burned and — assuming you wear it to bed — sleep quality, too. The advantage of the Windows Phone version is in the app's live tile. Thanks to background syncing, you'll be able to see some "glanceable" information about your activity, such as the steps you've taken, just by looking at the tile.



13.07.14. Nike FuelBand is available on Android. Two years after launching the FuelBand activity tracking wristband with iOS app, Nike finally has released the app for Android users. The companion app provides access to NikeFuel score information and history, and makes it so that your Android device can connect to your FuelBand as long as it has Bluetooth LE capabilities. Other features include the ability to track and receive progress updates for a daily NikeFuel goal, tracking by individual session, the new “Win the Hour” feature for FuelBand SE owners, leaderboard with friends, syncing in the background over Bluetooth LE and more.



22.04.14. Nike will stop developing FuelBand. Nike fired much of the team responsible for the development of its FuelBand and shelved plans for a new version of the fitness tracker. Why run for the exit now? Nike FuelBand is now one of the market leaders and receives generally good reviews. Nike isn't leaving behind wearables - it's just not going to make any new hardware. The company said it will continue to support existing FuelBands, and its team will work to adapt the software for more platforms. Given Nike's close ties to Apple, this only fuels speculation about an upcoming release of the long-rumored Apple wearable — the iWatch.