Fitbit Charge vs Microsoft Band


29
Fitbit Charge
An advanced wristband to elevate every day. Track steps, distance, calories burned, floors climbed & active minutes. See daily stats, time of day & Exercise Mode on the OLED display. See incoming call notifications when your phone is nearby. Monitor your sleep automatically & wake with a silent alarm. Sync stats wirelessly & automatically to leading smartphones and computers. Get continuous, automatic, wrist-based heart rate & simplified heart rate zones (with Fitbit Charge HR)
15
Microsoft Band
Microsoft Band, the first wearable powered by Microsoft Health, keeps fitness and productivity insights a glance away. Microsoft Band’s cutting-edge continuous heart rate monitoring provides a detailed calorie count and sleep quality measurements. With the inclusion of intelligent personal assistant Cortana, the band also offers hands-free access to the web and your most important correspondence whether you’re at the office or at the gym.

Latest news about Fitbit Charge and Microsoft Band:



04.01.17. Fitbit integrates with virtual reality bikes. Fitbit is rolling out new integrations to its top-selling fitness trackers. Peleton, a stationary bike company that offers live streaming classes, will feature Fitbit integration, letting users track their progress on the bike with their wearable, including a full post-workout break down. Ditto for VirZOOM, the indoor VR bike that we tried out at E3 last year, so users can track all of the time they’ve spent peddling around as a Pegasus or tank. Data collected includes distance pedaled (or, one assumes, miles flown in the case of the flying horse), workout time and calories burned. The partnerships will be on display this week at CES.



04.11.16. Microsoft killed its fitness tracker Microsoft Band. Microsoft will stop production and selling of its wrist-worn fitness tracker Band. The Microsoft Band was unveiled in October 2014, touted as the most advanced fitness tracker on the market. But the device, often criticized for its awkward, uncomfortable design, never really caught on. Microsoft introduced a second-generation model with added features last year, but it also carried forward many of the original's flaws. And now the company has decided to bow out of fitness wearables - at least for the time being — and cede the market to companies like Fitbit, Samsung, Garmin, Misfit, and smartwatch makers including Apple. Also in September, the company renamed its smartphone health app to Microsoft Band and that software still remains available for existing users.



29.08.16. Fitbit unveiled waterproof Flex 2 and smarter Charge 2. Fitbit is updating two of its most popular fitness trackers - the new waterproof Flex 2 and heart rate-tracking Charge 2. With the $150 Charge 2, Fitbit redesigned its Charge HR with a larger display that makes the tracker look and feel more like a fitness watch. The Charge's fitness-tracking abilities have also been upgraded with new features that are able to record specific types of workouts, like weightlifting, runs, bike rides and interval sessions, and the tracker will automatically recognize some types of activities like yoga and running. If the Charge 2 is more fitness tracker than you need, Fitbit is also releasing a new version of its smallest tracker, the $99.95 Flex 2. It became much slimmer and  water-resistant (at depths up to 164-feet). Like the Flex before it, the Flex 2 eschews a traditional display in favor of a series of LED lights that indicate your progress throughout the day.



30.10.14. Microsoft unveiled its own fitness band. Microsoft announced its first wearable - Microsoft Band. The band helps you keep track of things like your heart rate, steps, calories burned, and sleep. It also provides guided workouts, 24-hour heart rate monitoring and automatic activity counting, as well as email previews and calendar alerts, according to the Google Play Store details. It also has Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) sensors, which can tell if you're wearing it or not and a UV sensor to help you decide on whether to apply sunscreen. The companion Microsoft Health app is available on Windows Phone, iPhone and Android. The band will cost $199.



28.10.14. Fitbit unveiled fitness wristbands Charge, Charge HR and fitness watch Surge. Fitbit unveiled three new devices: the Fitbit Charge (a reboot of the Fitbit Force), the Fitbit Charge HR (which comes with heart-rate monitoring) and the Fitbit Surge, a device specialized for runners (with some smartwatch capabilities). The Fitbit Charge ($129.95, launching in mid-November) is the replacement to the Fitbit Force, but it also added a feature to track sleeping without needing to put it in sleep mode. The Fitbit Charge HR is nearly the same as standard Fitbit Charge but it comes with continuous heart rate tracker, that adds $20 to the price. And Fitbit Surge is a fitness smartwatch, which comes with continuous heart-rate monitoring, built-in GPS, sleep analysis activity tracking and promises up to 7 days of battery life on a charge. The Fitbit Surge will launch in early 2015 for $249.95.